Discrimination case won on International Day against Homophobia

On the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia, 17 May, a court in Chisinau found a man liable for harassment and victimization of his ex-wife on the ground of sexual orientation. This is an important victory in the fight against discrimination and it is the first time that the Law on Ensuring Equality has been applied in a court judgement.

On 17 May, a first instance court in Chisinau found a man liable for harassment and victimization of his ex-wife on the ground of her sexual orientation. Dissatisfied with the fact that his wife stated that she was a lesbian and asked for divorce, the man had been threatening and insulting her. He had also informed their common daughter’s teachers about this, which led to negative reactions. On 17 May, a first instance court in Chisinau admitted the claim on the basis of the Law #121 on Ensuring Equality and pronounced that this undoubtedly showed that the defendant had harassed and victimized his ex-wife on the ground of her sexual orientation.

“This is an important court decision in the fight against discrimination and for equal rights and we are happy that the court ruling is pronounced on the International Day against Homophobia”, says Åsa Bergqvist, Programme Officer for Eastern Europe and Central Asia at Civil Rights Defenders.

The 12th Pride festival “Rainbow over the Dniester”, started on 14 May in Chisinau. The programme includes a conference about the importance of good partnerships in the fight against discrimination, a flower-laying ceremony at the Victims of Repressions’ Monument as well as a theatre performance and other cultural events.

A flower-laying ceremony at the Victims of Repressions’ Monument. Photo: Civil Rights Defenders.

A flower-laying ceremony at the Victims of Repressions’ Monument. Photo: Civil Rights Defenders.

On the last day of the festival, on 19 May, a march under the slogan “LGBT for Traditional Values”, is aimed to take place in central Chisinau. Only days before the opening of the festival, groups related to the Orthodox Church have tried to cancel the march and called for a counterdemonstration on the same day.

“We expect that the Moldovan authorities fulfil their constitutional obligations to guarantee the right to freedom of assembly, and their duty to protect all participants in the march”, says Åsa Bergqvist, Programme Officer for Eastern Europe and Central Asia at Civil Rights Defenders.

The tolerance towards LGBT is extremely low in Moldova and during a Pride Parade in 2008, the demonstrators were violently attacked by religious hooligans.

Categories: News.
Tags: Law against discrimination and Pride.
Regions: Moldova.